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university where he teaches constitutional law at the college and the law school. he received both his b.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is the author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant t
contravention of the fourth amendment and complete contravention of the law at that time. as i'm sure and many of my colleagues will certainly recall this was revealed to the american public four years later when it was reported in "the new york times" in 2005. and in response after years of back and forth contentious debate, congress passed the fisa amendments act, the bill that we are considering on this floor today. we're considering a reauthorization. this law gave the government new surveillance authorities, but it also included a sunset provision to ensure that congress examines where the law is working and the way it was intended. now, the debate we're having right now on this floor is that reexamination. i will just note that i think it's unfortunate that we're doing this at the last second. we have known that this intelligence law is going to expire for years. it was laid out for a multiyear span. and certainly, it is irresponsible for this chamber to be debating this bill under a falsely created pressure that it needs to be done without any amendments in order to match the bill from
the connecticut massacre still raw, spencer michels looks at a california law that aims to head off such violence. >> reporter: though no one knows the diagnosis of the perpetrator of the shootings in newtown, the killings have raised once again the issue of forcing the mentally ill into treatment. >> warner: as congress comes back to washington to resume fiscal cliff negotiations, we ask, what happens if they don't reach a deal? >> ifill: we talk with a representative of egypt's muslim brotherhood about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the goinsupport othese institutio and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation
about the new brotherhood-backed constitution signed into law today. >> warner: and we have another of our conversations with retiring members of congress. paul solman sat down with the always outspoken massachusetts democrat barney frank. >> the notion that people would not go along with an important public policy because i hurt their feelings, i don't think that's true. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: a major winter storm surged into the midwest and northeast, fouling flight schedules and ruining road conditions on this day after christmas. the huge weather system left a trail of destruction in the gulf coast region and at least six people dead. >> oh, wow, oh jesus, look at that tornado. >> ifill: the calm of christmas night was shattered by tornadoes dropping from
in the city, so there is sort of a very, kind of, unique law and relationship around these convenience zones. the crv redempt zones and how they are created and how the state law require that they are managed and facilitated and what this means to small business. so i want to put forward some proactive policy recommendations so that we're being ahead of the curve and not waiting until this may become an issue down the road for small businesses. so i just wanted to just make that clear. this is a policy discussion for you to take a look at, make recommendations. the commission can take action tonight, if it's comfortable or wait until the next commission meeting or two commission meetings. it's at your discretion to make sure that you are comfortable with the policy that is flushed out to be put forward to our policymakers in the city. so i just wanted to make sure that you understood that it's agendized as an action item tonight, but we do that as pro forma, as part of agendizing anything that the commission may be taking action on in case you want to take action tonight, but that is not n
have it in english and chinese. we have a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've
and graduation. it breeds hypocrisy within the school and encourages a scoff law at tuesday among college officials. papers over the prop of why so many latinos and blacks are academically competitive, and it gives states and schools involved in unsavory activities -- like decides which racial minorities will be heard and which ones not -- and how much blood is needed to establish group membership. and i didn't want even mention mismatch. -- i didn't even mention mismatch. [laughter] the mismatch book, in addition to o giving chapter or and verse and ample, irrefutable documentation for why this is a real problem also touches on some of these other problems that i've listed too. you add all those up, okay, and it seems to me that it's a lot stronger than the educational benefits from these random interracial conversations we might be having more of if we use racial preferences in admissions. okay. well, let me wrap up with one sort of happy note, but then one not so happy note. it seems to me -- and i think it ought to seem to the justices -- that one reason why we ought to end this nonse
ability to say, did you actually choose that and did you choose it in a way that the law would recognize. so the law all of the time develops concepts that scientists are interested in studying. it might be competency, for example. well, competency is really a multifaceted construct from a legal perspective. it could be competency to be executed, it could be competency to commit a crime. it could be competency to contribute to the decision as to whether voluntarily commit yourself to a mental hospital. it could be competency to participate in an abortion decision. so competency means many different things. the first thing you have to do as a scienst is ask the question, well, what does the law mean by it because if you want me to measure it, i have to somehow apply it. so going back to the question of free will, because a scientist can't operationally define it, they can't measure it, they're not really that much use to legal debates about free will. now, what does it mean on the legal side? i actually think the idea of free will or what is often referred to as volitional control plays a
is that the law and order and it's hard to keep up with that if everyone is pulling out of pistol. >> host: even in shootout at ok corral. >> guest: is started up because site claims it had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that for big carrying a firearm around town. incidentally the understanding of work on race were four began to evolve in the century and in particular this. in the early 19th century was a big problem with tools between gentlemen. the most famous is between aaron burr and hamilton. but this tooling was fairly common, but it was frowned upon and could be prosecuted and burr had to keep it around to avoid being prosecuted. and so, one of the means that the people who insisted on being able to settle matters of honor on the spot dirty to do in the early 19th century was carry small pistols concealed. this was seen by gentlemen as cowardly. if you cannot be a man can wear your pistol on your hip and don't sneakily carry it around and say turcotte. so that began to change. >> host: was still holds true today. most places don't have restrictions on open carr
laws and they just took a affect today. and we will tell you about one that affects you if you use facebook. >> reporter: well there are a total of 876 new laws in the books in our state and one is designed to protect homeowners trying to avoid foreclosure. this new law would prevent banks from starting the foreclosure basis and it will protect people going through alone modification. and you can still go ahead with the for close to our some time. it is now illegal to use facebook user i.d. and password to keep their jobs. colleges and user add mixes are also prohibited in doing the same thing and can no longer ask the students. driver less cars, pay paves the way and they are a bay area technical giant and as long as there is a real person watching nearby incase of an emergency. with more than 800 new laws, we can't go through all of them but these are just a few we have picked out but coming up in about 45 minutes we will tell you about a new law that has to do with carrying rifles in public. allie rasmus, ktvu channel 2 morning news. >>> thank you, alley. they are preparing a vi
't. though we may not know in any particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what do we want to do about it? now that we understand that those of us in the audience or up here that like chocolate cake may not have control over it, ho
sent to me in law school when he was over there in the peace corps. chris wrote wonderful notes and told me when he went running in the village where he was staying, only to have locals come up beside him and say where is it, where did it go. where is what? your donkey. i don't have a donkey. >> why are you running? [ laughter] >> for exercise. >> exercise? are you nuts? if you want exercise, come work on my orchard, you crazy american. >> chris succeeded because he knew how to laugh at himself and relate to people around him. there are two more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle th
cases against that school discipline, but holly has come up with a really wonderful solution within law enforcement that we would love you to talk about and it's preventive and solution. >> thank you. it's not going to be a shock to you that i don't have a sizzle reel but i did manage to get a few powerpoint slides in so it's a good thing if i can get my next one. can you advance it for me please? so it is a safety course that i created with yahoo. we partnered together. i started asking questions the first day so my boots are on the ground and i'm in the schools and i love doing what i do, and i believe wholeheartedly and i believe it was the soft power -- yes, i love it. i think it's effective in so many ways, so i had luckily teamed up with the right people at yahoo who were really amazing and just the foresight they saw, and believed in the concept that law enforcement needs to be a piece of this puzzle and have some solutions. we have a unique part in the schools and with kids and this did get certified for the peace officer standards and we get credit for that being police
or not they should pay the bills that they've already wracked up through the laws they passed. let me repeat, we can't not pay bills that we've already incurred. if congress refuses to give the united states government the ability to pay these bills on time, the consequences for the entire global economy would be catastrophic. far worse than the impact of a fiscal cliff. people will remember back in 2011, the last time this course of action was threatened, our entire recovery was put at risk. consumer confidence plunged, business investment plunged, growth dropped. we can't go down that path again. >> the president draws a line on one of the upcoming fights. joining us now is mike allen to review a little bit about what happened yesterday. mike, we were not sure there would be a vote at some point. obviously the house felt a bit jammed by the senate. did mitch mcconnell jam john boehner and force boehner's hand? >> he didn't force boehner's hand, but he did step up in a way that boehner didn't. people will tell you on capitol hill boehner's nerve never looked weaker, here's why. for most of the day
services organizations get to regularly meet with law enforcement and learn about their experience. i really appreciate officer hall who is also in eric chang's position; our organization has been involved with this commission for six years. while we have made lots of progress distilled is appointed that on a regular basis, almost every day, i will talk to someone who said that they did not know that they could have an interpreter. they were not offered an interpreter. they did not even get to speak to the police officer on the scene because there was no interpreter or they have to wait an hour or something along those lines and when you think about for survivor, even if they know they will get to have an interpreter, if they have to wait whether an hour or 45 minutes and during that time the officer is talking probably to the abusive partner, it changes the dynamic. the police come in but they're not always 100 percent sure that calling the police in the situation is going to be the most successful route. and then you have is a situation where they're not able to c
's not done yet, he's okay. and new controversial immigration gun law coming up. can the mexican government have a say how the u.s. deals with illegal immigration? we'll talk to arizona attorney general tom thorn, he weighs in on the ongoing legal battle. >> jamie: plus, a defiant act against president obama's health care law. an update on the u.s. company facing millions of dollars in fines for refusing to comply. >> kelly: and taking a stand in the wake of the tragic school shooting massacre at sandy hook elementary. what some teachers are doing to make their classrooms safer. >> i think that a lot of people have a fear of guns and of what they can do, but i think also that maybe they're not quite educated, that sometimes the only thing we'll talk about is a good guy with a gun. >> and welcome back, everyone, we're following a major challenge to the president's health care law, the arts and crafts chain hobby lobby now saying it will not pro he vied workers with health plans that cover the morning after pill. even though the new health care law requires it. this, after the supreme court
of cyber bullying and that is why i did a remarkable partnership in south florida with local law enforcement who had gone into schools talking about bullying, including cyber bullying and giving people concrete examples of things of situations they saw, it was remarkable. and that is why we will continue to do that work. so i hope today as we move forward you will understand that we are in this together with you at the department of justice. this is an all hands on deck enterprise. there is so much to do. i hope at the end of this day we will indeed all follow the lead of that student, walk out and say what are one or two things i'm going to do differently and better? how are we going to improve this situation? i hope if you take one and only one thing from melinda and my and ruslyn's remarks today, if you have an idea, please bring them to us. we want to learn from you. we are in this together and i want to say thank you because the most important thing we have is a recognition that you understand that this is indeed a national issue for us to deal with. i'm looking forw
a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront, but have the opportunity to participate -- and we have cards that you could fill out and questions. this promises to be a year of reform and change like we have never seen, and we now see prisoner reentry programs being implemented. we're still spending too much money and resources and not enough on rehabilitation and reentry. this november, the voters will decide on limiting the three strikes law. issues and measures long overdue. it is clear there is much more that needs to be done. according to a study that was published this month -- since 1989, 2000 people have been wrongfully incarcerated and they served collectively, 10,000 years. an average of 11 years person. i would like to thank the people who made this summit possible. memoranda -- amy devon -- many volunteers and all of our speakers and panelists. i would like to thank the co- sponsors, and the bar association of san francisco. i would like to thank them for their hel
, to say that he's been law enforcement for 30 years and bring back 30-year experience to this consideration of this bill, and he said this bill makes sense because drug treatment works and this is in spite of the fact we'll be battling the district attorneys along with many other arms of public safety. [laughter] >> we've got the data, we've got the facts and we know this will provide great benefit to our communities, to our neighborhoods, and to all of california. thank you for your support. [applause] >> tal, i want to go back to the question that marty posed earlier, which is in effect this idea that in order to incentivize people making the decision to seek treatment that the fear of a felony conviction or possible state prison sentence could play a positive role. you talk to a lot of people charged with crimes who are trying to make the decision of what decision to make, what is the primary motivation you see coming from them. how do they decision make on dispositions related to drug possession as a felony? >> i think that for a lot of people it does have to be a
conversations with superintendents and law enforcement officials as well about how we can address this data integrity issue and how a school won't be hoisted by their own petard because they had the courage to collect the data when other schools kind of look the other way. so, again, it's a hard question to answer in ways that are other than anecdote. there have been survey data and things of that nature, but i feel uncomfortable saying unequivocally this is what we know, these are the trends. i like to be evidence based and i'm not sure the evidence allows that. >> roslyn, challenges to you and secretary duncan. >> for the first time you can see data for the first time about the -- discipline and students referred to law enforcement, suspensions more than once. on the bullying and harassment we are also collecting for the first time ever data on the number of incidents of students disciplined for bullying and harassment. they are not exactly reliable. lots of folks aren't collecting this. our collection is at the school level so you could go and see all this data that pop out in nice
than laws, it can take decades to pass a good law, we saw those in changes of health care, what year were we starting to talk about revising our health care policies, i think it was 93 and it was 2008 before there was passage of a law so it can take decades and dozens of years, but if we ask for safer products, the market can turn on a dime. in 2007-2008, everyone started talking about bpa in plastics, by 2009, bpa-free plastics were everywhere, so can, not cancer is getting bpa out of food cans and they chased a huge success this year when campbell's soup said we're going to take the bpa out, we're waiting for a timeline from them and waiting for them to replace bpa with something safer, taking that first step was huge, even more significant perhaps is the campaign for safe cosmetics which has been around for about 10 years saying that -- getting johnson & jn -- johnson saying we're going to get carcinogens first out of our baby products across the whole world and that's really significant because they found formaldehyde in baby's johnson shampoo a few years ago, they tested it a f
they were only for the rich. now, for 98% of americans, the bush tax cuts are permanent law. permanency is something that he sought early on but he couldn't get it done with the g.o.p. ruling the house and the senate. there are not a lot of tasty morsels -- >> bob: so why do republicans run on the sword of taxes? it wasn't spending. it was on taxes. i don't know why they made at it big deal then. >> dana: i don't know. >> eric: we're getting tweeted and facebook from the right saying what did they do? what did boehner and the right do? >> kimberly: i have to tell you i don't think anybody is happy with the deal with the hardcore political constituencies on each sized. people are displeased. conservatives are upset, saying it opportunity affect the debt ceiling. it doesn't put a lid on the out-of-control reckless spending, titlements, all of that. they have to live it with. better than anything. but not what they stood on for principle. that is the problem. >> eric: what happened? literally for months we have been talking about this. last minute late, they decide they have a deal that do
. although knobloch or the constitution guarantees equal protection of the law, and the outlaws the whole purpose of it the 14th amendment was to outlaw racial standards. that seems pretty straightforward. there was an act of 1981 that been racial discrimination, including in regards to college tuition. it sounds pretty straightforward. think of those things not mean what they say. there is an exception in this area. you would think, well, gee, it would be an exception. it would be an exception to the principle of racial discrimination that is pretty clearly there in the law. the federal branch have spoken to that. it must be pretty strong and undeniable. it must be something like, you know, it helps us identify someone who is about to set up a nuclear bomb in new york city or something like that. it is very compelling. well, the argument is that if you use racial determination for college admissions, it is likely that there will be somewhat more -- somewhat more of unrehearsed, interracial conversations are in especially among students. under the african-american kids and a latino kids w
of new laws set to hit the books january 1 from new rules on the road to sales tax increases for sm.=i=r? we're live to preview some of the new rules and laws. nannette? californians taxes will go up in just a few days. the income tax will go up for high earners and sales tax going up for everyone. >> shoppers still getting their fill with after christmas sale buzz sales tax will jump another quarter sent bringing state wide tax to 7.5% for four years. california voters okayed the hike to safe schools from deeper cuts. >> i have a 17-year-old daughter and grandchildren going to be in school. whatever we've got to do, we'll dig in deeper to help. >> not everyone is happy with another tax hike. >> in the looking forward to it. this n reason for it to improve things but i never see it going towards that. >> also, help for senior citizens modeled after the amber alert a silver alert for anyone 65 or older who is missing and in great danger because of the medical conditions like alzheimer's. families typically have to wait 24 hours to file a report. >> silver alert law just super sides a
state and federal laws went into effect today. what you need to know right after the break. ♪ [ female announcer ] the one for all. mcdonald's dollar menu. home of the mouthwatering grilled onion cheddar burger, topped with melty white cheddar and caramelized onions. plus all your tasty favorites for just a dollar each. ♪ every day, as always, there's a lot to love for a little on mcdonald's dollar menu. ♪ just ask pc mag. [ man ] "cable can't touch fios upload speeds." "it's hard to imagine anyone ever beating fios." "there's no doubt fios is the fastest in the country." [ male announcer ] after 110,000 speed tests, nothing came close to fios. and fios doesn't cap your internet usage. so switch to fiber-optic fios because according to pc mag... [ man ] "if it's available, you should get it." [ male announcer ] last chance to get the fios triple play for our best price online of just $79.99 a month contact the verizon center for customers with disabilities for two years with a two-year agreement, at 800-974-6006 tty/v. plus get $300 back. >> on this new year's day, same sex wedding
for nearly 20 years a person convicted of breaking three law, no matter how minor would be sent to prison for life. no exceptions. john blackstone tonight reports on the young people who saw injustice in the three strikes law and set out to change it. >> reporter: at standford law school michael romano and his students don't just study justice, they go in search of it. seeking to free those who because of california's three strikes law are serving life sentences for minor crimes. >> his third strike was shoplifting a pair of gloves and a spool of wire from home depot. >> that is one of the inmates ashley nicole davis is helping and another client. >> was arrested, attempting to steal a car radio. >> reporter: california passed its harsh three strikes law in 1994 after the high profile kidnapping and killing of 12-year-old polly klaus by a repeat offender. it was meant to keep serial murders, rapists and child molesters off the streets. but standford's students saw a disturbing pattern. >> not just a handful of people who were sentenced to life. this wasn't the exception, this is the rule
. it was his sister-in-law. he showed her picture but said nothing else. tonight police confirm one suspect remains in custody but the investigation is continuing. in san francisco, linda yee, cbs 5. >> a bizarre standoff with a man who wasn't wearing any clothes but he did have a sword. police say a naked man with a samurai sword and assault rifle kept officers at bay for nearly two hours. >> statement when we got out of the vehicle were you're going to have to kill me. so he stated that several times. the officers, again, for safety reasons stood back and called in some reinforcements. >> the standoff lasted two hours before 29-year-old coco bennett was arrested. police say he had an ar-15 in his truck. >> a bay area bar has been targeted by credit card thieves. it was weeks before anybody caught on. christin ayers says customers went out for a beer. next thing they knew they were racking up charges in mexico. >> reporter: it's a name of a beer on the menu. but customers didn't expect that drinking here would mean getting their wallets swiped out. >> four to five charges. >> reporter: gen
-tv 11 news. >> a number of other new laws go into effect today. current city officials will get an extra year in office. a parent or guardian can freeze credit reports to protect kids from identity theft. they hope it can protect foster children. for more on all the new laws, you can visit our website, wbaltv.com. >> fireworks and parties unfolded all around the world. >> kurt gregory takes a look at new year's around the world. >> the first major city to celebrate 23 was in new zealand. in australia, a fireworks display dazzled hundreds of thousands in sydney where an estimated 1 billion people watching on tv. a large crowd in china. in tokyo, monks rang bells to cleanse sins. letting loose and dancing their way into 2013. more than 100,000 soldiers serving in afghanistan. in central russia, these brave ip.ls took an icy dept the water temperature was 37 degrees. the world's tallest building set the stage for a giant celebration. tens of thousands celebrated at the eiffel tower. big ben rang out the old and rang and the new. the tradition continued in the big apple. tens of thousands we
the law. law -- he would sign the law. they didn't make the deadline or get the grand bargain both parties claim was the ultimate goal. democrats and republicans gave themselves credit for getting something done. there was concern among republicans about a lack of spending cuts. some wanted to add them in but it was not enough votes to get it passed. the deal would extend income tax cuts for all workers earning more than 400,000 dollars a year and households earning over 450,000 dollars. it prevents a tax hike on estates valued at less than 5 million dollars and extends unemployment benefits for 2 million people set to expire and although congress missed a january 1st midnight deadline by-passing the compromised deal in the house and senate, congress can take credit for retroactive tax cuts. >> it's a very, very strong first step. >> this is an important one and a critical one for the future of the country. >> reporter: now in about two months, congress needs to deal with spending cuts they put off and there will be a fight over the debt ceiling. reporting live in federal hill, sherrie joh
and the treasury department will take extraordinary measures authorized by law. that will create head room under the debt limit. under normal circumstances circs that amount head room would last two months. but it's difficult to predict how long the money will last. where does the money come from? they will raise retirement fund and there is a slush fund from the exchange raid. >> the bigger problem is getting borrowing under control. it puts the nation at risk immediately for a crit downgrade but it means higher taxes and lower standard of living for future generations. doug? >> doug: the stocks fell. the dow lost 18. s&p 500 gave back two. nasdaq down four. >> doug: president george h.w. bush is at a hospital after having a stubborn fever. >> joe biden on hand to swear in brian shot as the hawaii newest senator. he was selected to fill the vacancy. >>> after the attack on benghazi there was widespread speculation some would lose their job after the security failure but it has nod happened. and john kerry's nomination as secretary of state could hang in the balance. peter doocy has the pieces t
how they work. there is a breath sample taken. law enforcement agencies say check points such as this one help to intercept drunk drivers and take them off of the streets. redwood city police officers have checked 15,000 vehicles so far this holiday period. and made 18 arrests. they support the bill. >> this legislation is being propose today is actually needed to be added as part of the arsenal that we have in detering people that may not just have the will, dedication or moral fort tud to not drive drunk. >> the device costs about $100 but requires ongoing cal braigs to ensure accuracy that can run an additional $50 to $100 every two months. mothers against drunk driving would prefer laws tougher. >> i prefer they're installed on every dui convicted person's car. this is a great stop gach. >> four california counties are in the middle of a pilot project in which those devices are required after the first dui conviction. and is hoping that feed back from that pilot project might provide ammunition it needs for a tougher law. >> writers on edge after another person was pu
rest on our way out of this problem. i no longer want to hear those words. this is not to give the law- enforcement a short shrift. i have had an impact on my husband's life, some of the unwanted. but he has had an impact on mind. i have done extensive work with law enforcement, with the lapd and the los angeles county sheriff's. i am here to tell you that crime has been driven down in los angeles because of their efforts, but not only because of their efforts. so what does the collaboration look like. i want you to keep some ideas in mind. there is no first among equals. what we learned in los angeles was that oppression alone was not the answer. it did not work. there were record highs in gang violence in 2005. i want to tell you what has happened between 2005 and 2012. number one, the grass roots -- the disorganize, fragmented, passionate grass roots must be part of this. the community members who go to county supervisors meetings, the members who pass out fliers, the youths who have been in the juvenile justice system that are now part of the coalition -- those individuals must hav
what may have caused the crash or if alcohol may have been involved. >>> and law enforcement agencies were really everywhere during the night, cracking down, looking out for drunk drivers. dui checkpoints were set ulall over the bay area and chp officers were patrolling those highways. yesterday, the chp said the number of dui arrests were down compared to last year. but new numbers for this year's crackdown may be released sometime today. >>> all right. 7:04. we want to check in again with tara. more about the accident in the south bay. >> one in mountain view, the one in the campbell area. 101 northbound at moveit boulevard is the first one -- move fet boulevard is the -- moffitt boulevard. this is a spinout accident. and kest campbell, it's a two- car crash. one lane is blocked. on the san mateo bridge, traffic is moving along, on the right side westbound as you drive to foster city. no problems. at the bay bridge toll plaza, it's clear sailing into san francisco this morning. 7:04. here's steve. >>> thank you, tara. >>> well, a little system, most of you probably missed it. but it
in his life, after he leaves milwaukee and goes to stanford law school is becoming a clerk for supreme court court justice robert jackson. tell us how that came about because i want to lead and to which you have with some of the conservatives among blacks than whites. >> guest: great. jackson was i think seeing my family than i say great justice. he had been the prosecutor at the nuremberg war charles. he actually taken time off from the court and gone to nuremberg and been the chief prosecutor and then came back to the court. so rehnquist graduates from the stanford law school early at the end of 1952. he was actually in the class that would've graduated a semester later, the rehnquist finished his work. he was so smart he got out early. so it was clear when i was researching through his papers and lucky not the diaries that he had actually, that were on were on deposit with his papers, which were fascinating. he had six notebooks that were filled with his reminiscences, desires and early comments and memoirs. one of the things that was clear was that he really saw himself destined fo
. >>> a police chase in pasadena ends in a bay area crash. also there are new laws going into effect next year, it is all ahead on the ktvu channel 2 morning news. this is ktvu channel 2 morning news. good morning everybody, it is thursday december 27th, i am brian flores in for dave clark. >> and i am claudine wong in for pam cook, it is nice to have a little bit of a break from that rain. >>> we just have some cloud cover to deal with this morning and we have more that will not interfere with rain showers. we have more up to the north notice there is a chance for a few sprinkles drifting into mendocino county but we have partly cloudy skies and temperatures are warming back up into the mid-50s, here is a look at traffic, good morning tara. >>> we don't know what traffic will be like if a lot of folks have the day off or if they are continuing christmas vacation but so far it looks pretty busy and you can see traffic is flowing well as you make your way towards foster city, and that's about it, 5:01 we will head back to the desk. >>> there has been a police shooting in w
by the department in connection with law enforcement on criminal matters in relationship to second amendment activities. and the commission is responsible for looking at that report and reviewing it for compliance and signing off on it. so let you know that happened. >> thank you very much, commissioner kingsley. commissioner loftus. >> yes, i just had a couple things. i think we talked a lot about the bravery and heroism and the crying, especially on my part, around officer gritch and cloud and thanks, commissioner mazzucco. i think it's important, i said it then, we often talk about what's wrong with the department and that's definitely a role we have and something we have to do, but it's important to talk just as much about what's right with the department and to be present when the officers were recounting finding this baby that wasn't raining and it was raining at 2:00 am and going under a muni stop, i'm sure you all have stories like this, all the 2,000 officers that we don't see, have these stories where you are called for this service. a lot of being a police officer is going into
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